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HEALTH CARE NEWS

US Congress extends CHIP, funds opioid crisis response following temporary shutdown

Publish date: February 9, 2018

By 

Gregory Twachtman 

Oncology Practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congress, despite a second shutdown in less than a month, was able to pass a number of financial extenders to fund key health care programs.

The bipartisan spending bill (H.R. 1892), passed in the early morning hours on Feb. 9 by a 71-28 vote in the Senate (16 Republicans and 12 Democrats voted against it, and Sen. John McCain [R-Ariz.] was not present) and a 240-186 vote in the House (67 Republicans and 119 Democrats voted against and 5 representatives did not vote). President Trump signed the bill later that morning.

 

The spending bill and continuing resolution to fund the government through March 23 includes $6 billion to fund treatment for opioid addiction and other mental health issues, $2 billion in additional funding for the National Institutes of Health, and 4 additional years of funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program. The additional CHIP funding extends the program for a total of 10 years.

The funding bill also made a technical correction to the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) track of the Medicare Quality Payment Program. It removes Part B drug reimbursement from the MIPS payment adjustment, so any positive or negative change to physician payments based on the MIPS score will only be applied to physician fee schedule payments.

The bill also repeals the Independent Payment Advisory Board, a panel created by the Affordable Care Act that would have the power to slash Medicare spending under certain budget circumstances. That board was never convened.

The funding legislation also accelerates closure of the Medicare Part D “donut hole,” the coverage gap in which beneficiaries must pay 100% of medication costs prior to entering catastrophic coverage.

Just over $7 billion was provided for community health centers and Medicare’s therapy caps were repealed.

While the funding bill was written in the Senate with bipartisan input and received bipartisan support, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) held up votes over objections to the more than $1 trillion it will add to the nation’s debt, as well as for the fact that there was no opportunity to introduce and vote on amendments, leading to an hours-long government shutdown.

There also were concerns about two issues that could have derailed the vote in the House. Democrats wanted to add language to address immigrants brought to this nation illegally as children, while some Republicans did not want to increase the federal debt. However, there were enough votes to pass the funding legislation.

gtwachtman@frontlinemedcom.com

Amid Outcry Over Facebook's Privacy Issues, New Approaches Are Needed to Protect Consumers

Drotumdi O

    Article ID: 692327  Released: 5-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT  Source Newsroom:  Indiana University    Add to Favorites    more news from this source   Share     Credit: Indiana University  Anjanette "Angie" Raymond  MEDIA CONTACT   Available for logged-in reporters only   CHANNELS   Government/Law ,  Internet Trends ,  Social Media ,  Cybersecurity   KEYWORDS   Facebook ,  Privacy Issues ,  privacy law ,  Privacy concerns ,  Internet ,  + Show More     FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE  Newswise — BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Facebook's current privacy crisis and questions about how Google gathers, uses and stores our personal information demonstrate an urgent need to review and replace inadequate and outdated ways to regulate data and information, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.  In a forthcoming paper in Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice, Anjanette "Angie" Raymond, an associate professor of business law and ethics in the Kelley School, recommends a new legal framework to better identify what information is worthy of robust protection.  "Existing information governance is haphazard and often limited by sector," said Raymond, who directs IU's Ostrom Workshop Program on Data Management and Information Governance and is an adjunct associate professor in the IU Maurer School of Law.  "Current regulation, or case law, fails to fully consider the nuisances of ubiquitous information flows," she said. "Instead, the current system seeks to cram new data-related issues into existing legal frameworks, which are designed for paper and pencil and simple single-step technology."  Raymond offers an approach to managing data that includes ruling out the traditional use of privacy and property laws when it comes to digital information.  "It's almost silly to argue for privacy protections when you're posting stuff to the public on Facebook and other social media outlets," she said. "We have to think about everything we share as containing tons of data and information that can be extracted and shared amongst a lot of different people. Regulation must reflect this reality"  For example, there's a lot of data associated with simply posting a picture to your profile. Looking at the current Facebook crisis, Raymond said Cambridge Analytica's use of data from various Facebook apps really isn't much different; they just gathered the information into a single source.  "People are frustrated, feeling they were tricked to give away information as they engaged with activities on third-party apps," she said. "This sentiment is strong, yet everyone must understand that everything you post, click, like -- everything you do -- creates data that others can use. And scraping data is not extraordinarily difficult, so posting data at one place makes that data and information available to many."  Instead of using privacy as a guiding principle, Raymond said it's more appropriate to use a model based upon the use of the data and the impact that using, sharing, re-sharing and potential loss will have on individuals.  She said it's important to keep in mind that much of the data at issue is information that social media sites require to verify users' identity. They require users to provide key and often sensitive information, and users don't have an option to opt-out.  While these situations may upset users, the law presently provides few clear guiding principles on how information should be shared.  "The existing gaps in legal regulation have led to industry attempting to fill the void, but these attempts are in their infancy and are often ineffective," Raymond said.  "We're not going to have the answers," she added. Until a more appropriate means of addressing these issues is established, "we need to accept the fact that we are currently standing with uncertain footing."  The article, "Information and the Regulatory Landscape: A Growing Need to Reconsider Existing Legal Frameworks," will appear in the spring issue of Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice.               COMMENTS  |  COMMENTING POLICY   We recommend   ‘No free lunch’ online: User data keeps Facebook afloat   Newswise   IU Experts Available to Discuss Supreme Court Ruling on Affordable Care Act   Newswise   Framework to Protect Privacy Released   Newswise   Social Media Actually Strengthen Social Ties, Various Demographics Engage Differently, Study Says   Newswise   Kinsey Reporter: Free App Allows Public to Anonymously Report, Share Information on Sexual Behavior   Newswise   Your Phone Can Diagnose What's Wrong With You. But Should You Trust It?   360Dx   8 Tips for being HIPAA Compliant on Social Media   Anne Baye Ericksen, Weatherby Healthcare   Meet leading healthcare players and innovators at MedCity INVEST in Chicago   MedCity - INVEST Conference   Hear from VC, healthcare execs and 40+ startups at MedCity INVEST in Chicago   MedCity - INVEST Conference   How to Promote Your Medical Practice on Facebook   Lindsay Wilcox, CompHealth   Powered by  TrendMD      View All Latest News

 

Article ID: 692327

Released: 5-Apr-2018 1:05 PM EDT

Source Newsroom: Indiana University

Add to Favorites

more news from this source

Share

 

Credit: Indiana University

Anjanette "Angie" Raymond

MEDIA CONTACT

Available for logged-in reporters only

CHANNELS

Government/Law, Internet Trends, Social Media, Cybersecurity

KEYWORDS

Facebook, Privacy Issues, privacy law, Privacy concerns, Internet,

+ Show More

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Newswise — BLOOMINGTON, Ind. -- Facebook's current privacy crisis and questions about how Google gathers, uses and stores our personal information demonstrate an urgent need to review and replace inadequate and outdated ways to regulate data and information, according to research from Indiana University's Kelley School of Business.

In a forthcoming paper in Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice, Anjanette "Angie" Raymond, an associate professor of business law and ethics in the Kelley School, recommends a new legal framework to better identify what information is worthy of robust protection.

"Existing information governance is haphazard and often limited by sector," said Raymond, who directs IU's Ostrom Workshop Program on Data Management and Information Governance and is an adjunct associate professor in the IU Maurer School of Law.

"Current regulation, or case law, fails to fully consider the nuisances of ubiquitous information flows," she said. "Instead, the current system seeks to cram new data-related issues into existing legal frameworks, which are designed for paper and pencil and simple single-step technology."

Raymond offers an approach to managing data that includes ruling out the traditional use of privacy and property laws when it comes to digital information.

"It's almost silly to argue for privacy protections when you're posting stuff to the public on Facebook and other social media outlets," she said. "We have to think about everything we share as containing tons of data and information that can be extracted and shared amongst a lot of different people. Regulation must reflect this reality"

For example, there's a lot of data associated with simply posting a picture to your profile. Looking at the current Facebook crisis, Raymond said Cambridge Analytica's use of data from various Facebook apps really isn't much different; they just gathered the information into a single source.

"People are frustrated, feeling they were tricked to give away information as they engaged with activities on third-party apps," she said. "This sentiment is strong, yet everyone must understand that everything you post, click, like -- everything you do -- creates data that others can use. And scraping data is not extraordinarily difficult, so posting data at one place makes that data and information available to many."

Instead of using privacy as a guiding principle, Raymond said it's more appropriate to use a model based upon the use of the data and the impact that using, sharing, re-sharing and potential loss will have on individuals.

She said it's important to keep in mind that much of the data at issue is information that social media sites require to verify users' identity. They require users to provide key and often sensitive information, and users don't have an option to opt-out.

While these situations may upset users, the law presently provides few clear guiding principles on how information should be shared.

"The existing gaps in legal regulation have led to industry attempting to fill the void, but these attempts are in their infancy and are often ineffective," Raymond said.

"We're not going to have the answers," she added. Until a more appropriate means of addressing these issues is established, "we need to accept the fact that we are currently standing with uncertain footing."

The article, "Information and the Regulatory Landscape: A Growing Need to Reconsider Existing Legal Frameworks," will appear in the spring issue of Washington and Lee Journal of Civil Rights and Social Justice.

 

 

 

 

COMMENTS | COMMENTING POLICY

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Meet leading healthcare players and innovators at MedCity INVEST in Chicago

MedCity - INVEST Conference

Hear from VC, healthcare execs and 40+ startups at MedCity INVEST in Chicago

MedCity - INVEST Conference

How to Promote Your Medical Practice on Facebook

Lindsay Wilcox, CompHealth

Powered by TrendMD

View All Latest News