Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

14893 Northwest Purvis Drive
Portland, OR, 97229
United States

971-208-5909

Reliable source for medical, health and beauty products, medical review articles and business medicine services.

HEALTH CARE NEWS

US Congress extends CHIP, funds opioid crisis response following temporary shutdown

Publish date: February 9, 2018

By 

Gregory Twachtman 

Oncology Practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congress, despite a second shutdown in less than a month, was able to pass a number of financial extenders to fund key health care programs.

The bipartisan spending bill (H.R. 1892), passed in the early morning hours on Feb. 9 by a 71-28 vote in the Senate (16 Republicans and 12 Democrats voted against it, and Sen. John McCain [R-Ariz.] was not present) and a 240-186 vote in the House (67 Republicans and 119 Democrats voted against and 5 representatives did not vote). President Trump signed the bill later that morning.

 

The spending bill and continuing resolution to fund the government through March 23 includes $6 billion to fund treatment for opioid addiction and other mental health issues, $2 billion in additional funding for the National Institutes of Health, and 4 additional years of funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program. The additional CHIP funding extends the program for a total of 10 years.

The funding bill also made a technical correction to the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) track of the Medicare Quality Payment Program. It removes Part B drug reimbursement from the MIPS payment adjustment, so any positive or negative change to physician payments based on the MIPS score will only be applied to physician fee schedule payments.

The bill also repeals the Independent Payment Advisory Board, a panel created by the Affordable Care Act that would have the power to slash Medicare spending under certain budget circumstances. That board was never convened.

The funding legislation also accelerates closure of the Medicare Part D “donut hole,” the coverage gap in which beneficiaries must pay 100% of medication costs prior to entering catastrophic coverage.

Just over $7 billion was provided for community health centers and Medicare’s therapy caps were repealed.

While the funding bill was written in the Senate with bipartisan input and received bipartisan support, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) held up votes over objections to the more than $1 trillion it will add to the nation’s debt, as well as for the fact that there was no opportunity to introduce and vote on amendments, leading to an hours-long government shutdown.

There also were concerns about two issues that could have derailed the vote in the House. Democrats wanted to add language to address immigrants brought to this nation illegally as children, while some Republicans did not want to increase the federal debt. However, there were enough votes to pass the funding legislation.

gtwachtman@frontlinemedcom.com

FDA proposes lower nicotine levels in cigarettes

Drotumdi O

 Reader Poll  FDA proposes lower nicotine levels in cigarettes  Publish date: March 15, 2018  By   Gregory Twachtman   Pediatric News                                Nicotine levels in cigarettes could see a significant reduction under regulatory options being considered by the Food and Drug Administration.  Cigarettes “are the only legal consumer product that, when used as intended, will kill half all long-term users,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, said in a  statement  announcing the effort.  ricky_68fr/fotolia  The agency is seeking comment on a proposed regulation regarding “a potential maximum nicotine level that would be appropriate for the protection of public health, in light of scientific evidence about the addictive properties of nicotine in cigarettes.” An  advance notice  of proposed rule making was posted online March 15 and is scheduled for publication in the Federal Register on March 16.  The FDA also is seeking comments on a number of other areas to help inform potential regulatory action down the road, including whether a new standard for lower nicotine levels should be implemented at once or whether a phased-in approach should be taken; whether FDA should specify a method for manufacturers to use in order to detect nicotine levels in their products; and whether the proposed lower level is technically achievable.  The agency also is seeking comment on potential unintended effects of lowering the amount of nicotine in cigarettes, such as turning to other combustible tobacco products such as cigars in conjunction with or as a replacement for cigarette use; increasing the number of cigarettes smoked, or seeking comparable nicotine from noncombustible tobacco sources.  At this time, FDA is not suggesting what the target might be on a specific nicotine level. While the advanced notice asks specifically about the “merits of nicotine levels like 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 mg nicotine/g of tobacco filler,” it is not suggesting that this is the range being considered.     Which FDA anti-smoking proposals do you think will have the greatest impact?  Ultra-low nicotine cigarettes to combat cigarette addiction More/better combustible cigarette alternatives Modernized cessation products including patches and lozenges Increased enforcement of regulations to keep nicotine products away from children  Vote View Results   “Not to prejudge any possible proposed rule that we would do or any possible level, that is the purpose of an advanced proposed rule making, but we share all the science that we are aware of, and we characterize the studies that have been done to date in trying to find out what that right level is,” Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA Center for Tobacco Products, said during a March 15 press call.  He said that the FDA aiming to make sure the level is low enough that it cannot be compensated for by smoking more or inhaling deeper and holding the breath in longer, much like how smokers compensated when they smoked “light” cigarettes in the unregulated market.  Pages  1   2    next ›    last »   Next Article:   MDedge Daily News: Could gut bacteria trigger autoimmune diseases?      Comments (0)  Recommended for You  News & Commentary   Collaboration, consultation part of AAP teen depression guidelines update    Certifications, training to increase addiction medicine specialists    Time to therapy for gram-positive bacteremia reduced from 60 hours to 4 hours    Sexual harassment, violence is our problem, too    EHR application doubles hypertension recognition rate   Quizzes from MD-IQ   Anemia of prematurity: Features, diagnosis, & treatment    Clinical manifestations of congenital syphilis   Research Summaries from ClinicalEdge   RVs and Reduced Diarrhea-Linked Heath Care Use    Bullying Eases Among School-Aged Children    Practice Management    Pulmonology       Close      More Practice Management News   MDedge Daily News: Could gut bacteria trigger lupus?    MDedge Daily News: Does more marijuana mean fewer opioids?    MDedge Daily News: How gastric bypass helps fight diabetes    Patients who hide. Patients who seek.    MDedge Daily News: How European data privacy rules may cost you    more    This Just In   Always get culture in symptomatic children with neurogenic bladder    Patients who hide. Patients who seek.    PPIs, H2RAs in infants raise later allergy risk    Alopecia areata has female predominance, more severe types common in boys    Pilot study: Topical anticholinergic improved axillary hyperhidrosis in teens, young adults    more    Conference Coverage   Preparing to respond to workplace violence    MedPAC mulls boost to payments for E&M visits    Treatment of hemangioma with brand-name propranolol tied to fewer dosing errors    Mental health services can be successfully integrated in primary care    Talking with vaccine-hesitant parents takes training and finesse    Female physicians can face breastfeeding challenges at work    Fat shaming interferes with patients’ medical care, experts say    How to get through the tough talks about alopecia areata    Childhood vaccine trauma

Reader Poll

FDA proposes lower nicotine levels in cigarettes

Publish date: March 15, 2018

By

Gregory Twachtman

Pediatric News

 

 

 

 

 

Nicotine levels in cigarettes could see a significant reduction under regulatory options being considered by the Food and Drug Administration.

Cigarettes “are the only legal consumer product that, when used as intended, will kill half all long-term users,” FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, MD, said in a statement announcing the effort.

ricky_68fr/fotolia

The agency is seeking comment on a proposed regulation regarding “a potential maximum nicotine level that would be appropriate for the protection of public health, in light of scientific evidence about the addictive properties of nicotine in cigarettes.” An advance notice of proposed rule making was posted online March 15 and is scheduled for publication in the Federal Register on March 16.

The FDA also is seeking comments on a number of other areas to help inform potential regulatory action down the road, including whether a new standard for lower nicotine levels should be implemented at once or whether a phased-in approach should be taken; whether FDA should specify a method for manufacturers to use in order to detect nicotine levels in their products; and whether the proposed lower level is technically achievable.

The agency also is seeking comment on potential unintended effects of lowering the amount of nicotine in cigarettes, such as turning to other combustible tobacco products such as cigars in conjunction with or as a replacement for cigarette use; increasing the number of cigarettes smoked, or seeking comparable nicotine from noncombustible tobacco sources.

At this time, FDA is not suggesting what the target might be on a specific nicotine level. While the advanced notice asks specifically about the “merits of nicotine levels like 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 mg nicotine/g of tobacco filler,” it is not suggesting that this is the range being considered.

 

Which FDA anti-smoking proposals do you think will have the greatest impact?

Ultra-low nicotine cigarettes to combat cigarette addiction
More/better combustible cigarette alternatives
Modernized cessation products including patches and lozenges
Increased enforcement of regulations to keep nicotine products away from children

VoteView Results

“Not to prejudge any possible proposed rule that we would do or any possible level, that is the purpose of an advanced proposed rule making, but we share all the science that we are aware of, and we characterize the studies that have been done to date in trying to find out what that right level is,” Mitch Zeller, director of the FDA Center for Tobacco Products, said during a March 15 press call.

He said that the FDA aiming to make sure the level is low enough that it cannot be compensated for by smoking more or inhaling deeper and holding the breath in longer, much like how smokers compensated when they smoked “light” cigarettes in the unregulated market.

Pages

1

2

next ›

last »

Next Article:

MDedge Daily News: Could gut bacteria trigger autoimmune diseases?

   Comments (0)

Recommended for You

News & Commentary

Collaboration, consultation part of AAP teen depression guidelines update

Certifications, training to increase addiction medicine specialists

Time to therapy for gram-positive bacteremia reduced from 60 hours to 4 hours

Sexual harassment, violence is our problem, too

EHR application doubles hypertension recognition rate

Quizzes from MD-IQ

Anemia of prematurity: Features, diagnosis, & treatment

Clinical manifestations of congenital syphilis

Research Summaries from ClinicalEdge

RVs and Reduced Diarrhea-Linked Heath Care Use

Bullying Eases Among School-Aged Children

Practice Management

Pulmonology

Close

More Practice Management News

MDedge Daily News: Could gut bacteria trigger lupus?

MDedge Daily News: Does more marijuana mean fewer opioids?

MDedge Daily News: How gastric bypass helps fight diabetes

Patients who hide. Patients who seek.

MDedge Daily News: How European data privacy rules may cost you

more

This Just In

Always get culture in symptomatic children with neurogenic bladder

Patients who hide. Patients who seek.

PPIs, H2RAs in infants raise later allergy risk

Alopecia areata has female predominance, more severe types common in boys

Pilot study: Topical anticholinergic improved axillary hyperhidrosis in teens, young adults

more

Conference Coverage

Preparing to respond to workplace violence

MedPAC mulls boost to payments for E&M visits

Treatment of hemangioma with brand-name propranolol tied to fewer dosing errors

Mental health services can be successfully integrated in primary care

Talking with vaccine-hesitant parents takes training and finesse

Female physicians can face breastfeeding challenges at work

Fat shaming interferes with patients’ medical care, experts say

How to get through the tough talks about alopecia areata

Childhood vaccine trauma