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HEALTH CARE NEWS

US Congress extends CHIP, funds opioid crisis response following temporary shutdown

Publish date: February 9, 2018

By 

Gregory Twachtman 

Oncology Practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congress, despite a second shutdown in less than a month, was able to pass a number of financial extenders to fund key health care programs.

The bipartisan spending bill (H.R. 1892), passed in the early morning hours on Feb. 9 by a 71-28 vote in the Senate (16 Republicans and 12 Democrats voted against it, and Sen. John McCain [R-Ariz.] was not present) and a 240-186 vote in the House (67 Republicans and 119 Democrats voted against and 5 representatives did not vote). President Trump signed the bill later that morning.

 

The spending bill and continuing resolution to fund the government through March 23 includes $6 billion to fund treatment for opioid addiction and other mental health issues, $2 billion in additional funding for the National Institutes of Health, and 4 additional years of funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program. The additional CHIP funding extends the program for a total of 10 years.

The funding bill also made a technical correction to the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) track of the Medicare Quality Payment Program. It removes Part B drug reimbursement from the MIPS payment adjustment, so any positive or negative change to physician payments based on the MIPS score will only be applied to physician fee schedule payments.

The bill also repeals the Independent Payment Advisory Board, a panel created by the Affordable Care Act that would have the power to slash Medicare spending under certain budget circumstances. That board was never convened.

The funding legislation also accelerates closure of the Medicare Part D “donut hole,” the coverage gap in which beneficiaries must pay 100% of medication costs prior to entering catastrophic coverage.

Just over $7 billion was provided for community health centers and Medicare’s therapy caps were repealed.

While the funding bill was written in the Senate with bipartisan input and received bipartisan support, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) held up votes over objections to the more than $1 trillion it will add to the nation’s debt, as well as for the fact that there was no opportunity to introduce and vote on amendments, leading to an hours-long government shutdown.

There also were concerns about two issues that could have derailed the vote in the House. Democrats wanted to add language to address immigrants brought to this nation illegally as children, while some Republicans did not want to increase the federal debt. However, there were enough votes to pass the funding legislation.

gtwachtman@frontlinemedcom.com

When It Comes to Cardio vs Resistance Training New Research Shows, You Can't Judge the Calorie Burn by Its Number

Drotumdi O

 When It Comes to Cardio vs Resistance Training New Research Shows, You Can’t Judge the Calorie Burn by Its Number  Les Mills International     Article ID: 691118  Released: 15-Mar-2018 9:00 AM EDT  Source Newsroom:  Les Mills    Add to Favorites               Share           Credit: Les Mills International  MEDIA CONTACT   Available for logged-in reporters only   CITATIONS    Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport - JSAMS-1816; No. of Pages5    CHANNELS   All Journal News ,  Exercise and Fitness ,  Sports ,  Sports Medicine ,  Obesity ,  Weight Loss      Newswise — A newly published research study conducted by Dr. Nigel Harris, a senior lecturer in Exercise Science at Auckland University of Technology and published this month in the  Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport  shows that all calorie burns are not created equal.  A link to the paper published in the  Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport  is available  here . The results of this study have implications for the millions of Americans who rely on wearable devices to measure their calorie output during exercise. “Calories matter, but so does how they are burned,” says lead researcher Dr Nigel Harris of the Auckland University of Technology.  â€œThe type of exercise used to burn those calories we now know impacts the long-term positive effects that exercise has on your body.”  Setting out to establish whether burning calories doing cardiovascular exercise was the same as burning calories doing resistance training, the study looked at physiological and hormonal responses to the two different workouts, when the number of calories burned and the duration of the two sessions was exactly the same.  The study showed that resistance training triggers far greater fat-burning responses in the body than simple calorie counting suggests.  A test was set up that compared the physiological and hormonal responses of 12 healthy, recreationally active female participants to the two different types of workouts.  The calories burned during the resistance workout, a Les Mills’ BODYPUMPâ„¢ class that uses light to moderate weights with high repetition, were measured and used to set the intensity of the subsequent cycling session to ensure the caloric expenditure was exactly the same between both workouts. Blood was taken from the participants before and after the resistance-training workout, and before and after the cycling session, to measure their hormonal profiles.  “The results clearly demonstrate that calories are not the best indicator of how effective our workouts are,” says Bryce Hastings, Head of Research for global fitness company Les Mills International, which collaborated on the study. â€œA workout that burns 300 calories through effective resistance training like BODYPUMPâ„¢ does far more for our bodies over the long-term than a cardio workout that burns those same 300 calories.”  Both workouts boosted levels of Human Growth Hormone (HGH) which oxidizes fat and builds lean muscle tissue but HGH was 56% greater after the resistance workout compared to steady state cycling.  “That increased boost of Human Growth Hormone (HGH) caused by the resistance workout makes a big difference in ongoing calorie expenditure because HGH oxidises fat and builds lean muscle tissue, which in turn burns more calories,” says Hastings. â€œThe more muscle you can build, the more calories your body will burn long-term. Combine that with increased fat loss and the result leads to rapid changes in body composition.”  Additionally, blood lactate was also measured. The accumulation of lactate from exercise sparks the hormone growth response described above. In fact, it is widely accepted that exercising at an intensity above the lactate threshold, for a minimum of 10 minutes within a workout, is the greatest stimulus there is to the secretion of HGH.  Lactate was a staggering 81% greater after the resistance training workout as compared to the cycling workout.  In this era of activity tracking when we have instant workout data at our fingertips, it’s tempting to measure all exercise by the number of calories burned, this study clearly demonstrates that it’s not just about the number of calories burned but the variety of ways in which you burn them.   A workout regime that combines the right balance of resistance and cardio training helps ensure all the positive long-term benefits are maximized, making calorie counting just one consideration when judging your workout.  About Les Mills Les Mills International is the creator of 21 global group fitness and team training programs, including BODYPUMP® (weights), BODYCOMBAT® (martial arts), RPM® (indoor cycling), LES MILLS GRIT® (30-minute high intensity interval training) and LES MILLS SPRINTâ„¢ (high-intensity cycling). Every week, millions of people get fit in 19,500 clubs across 100 countries with the help of 130,000 Les Mills instructors. In the U.S. alone, Les Mills has 33,000 highly-trained instructors teaching at 3,800 gyms and clubs.  Significant investment in ongoing research is an important part of Les Mills’ business, and enables its club partners and their members to know that Les Mills group fitness programs are effective and safe.  Les Mills partners with universities around the world to conduct research to investigate areas of exercise science it wants to find out more about and test the effects of its programs on key community health factors such as obesity and heart disease.  Its research is independent, peer-reviewed and industry-recognized.   For more information, visit  lesmills.com/research        SEE ORIGINAL STUDY           COMMENTS  |  COMMENTING POLICY   We recommend   Experts Available at ACSM Summit; Metabolic Training – The Ultimate Cardio+Resistance Training Fusion!   Newswise   Resistance Training Complements Aerobic Exercise for Women   Newswise   Tips on Choosing the Right Trainer from Cedars-Sinai Weight Loss Center Physician with Unique Expertise   Newswise   Minutes of Hard Exercise Can Lead to All-Day Calorie Burn   Newswise   M. D. Anderson’s Seven-Day Exercise Plan   Newswise   Effect of tai chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial   Chenchen Wang et al., The BMJ   Moving beyond cardio: the value of resistance training, balance training, and other forms of exercise in the management of diabetes.   Marni J Armstrong et al., Diabetes Spectr   Effect of regular exercise training on changes in HbA1c, BMI and VO2max among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: an 8-year trial   Farzad Najafipour et al., BMJ Open Diab Res Care   Stair ascending–descending exercise accelerates the decrease in postprandial hyperglycemia more efficiently than bicycle exercise   Tetsuo Takaishi et al., BMJ Open Diab Res Care   Share your Insights and Learn How Readers Discover Content   TrendMD, Renew Publishing Consultants

When It Comes to Cardio vs Resistance Training New Research Shows, You Can’t Judge the Calorie Burn by Its Number

Les Mills International

 

Article ID: 691118

Released: 15-Mar-2018 9:00 AM EDT

Source Newsroom: Les Mills

Add to Favorites

 

 

 

 

Share

 

 

 

Credit: Les Mills International

MEDIA CONTACT

Available for logged-in reporters only

CITATIONS

Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport - JSAMS-1816; No. of Pages5

CHANNELS

All Journal News, Exercise and Fitness, Sports, Sports Medicine, Obesity, Weight Loss

 

Newswise — A newly published research study conducted by Dr. Nigel Harris, a senior lecturer in Exercise Science at Auckland University of Technology and published this month in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport shows that all calorie burns are not created equal.  A link to the paper published in the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport is available here. The results of this study have implications for the millions of Americans who rely on wearable devices to measure their calorie output during exercise. “Calories matter, but so does how they are burned,” says lead researcher Dr Nigel Harris of the Auckland University of Technology.  â€œThe type of exercise used to burn those calories we now know impacts the long-term positive effects that exercise has on your body.”

Setting out to establish whether burning calories doing cardiovascular exercise was the same as burning calories doing resistance training, the study looked at physiological and hormonal responses to the two different workouts, when the number of calories burned and the duration of the two sessions was exactly the same.  The study showed that resistance training triggers far greater fat-burning responses in the body than simple calorie counting suggests.

A test was set up that compared the physiological and hormonal responses of 12 healthy, recreationally active female participants to the two different types of workouts.  The calories burned during the resistance workout, a Les Mills’ BODYPUMPâ„¢ class that uses light to moderate weights with high repetition, were measured and used to set the intensity of the subsequent cycling session to ensure the caloric expenditure was exactly the same between both workouts. Blood was taken from the participants before and after the resistance-training workout, and before and after the cycling session, to measure their hormonal profiles.

“The results clearly demonstrate that calories are not the best indicator of how effective our workouts are,” says Bryce Hastings, Head of Research for global fitness company Les Mills International, which collaborated on the study. â€œA workout that burns 300 calories through effective resistance training like BODYPUMPâ„¢ does far more for our bodies over the long-term than a cardio workout that burns those same 300 calories.”

Both workouts boosted levels of Human Growth Hormone (HGH) which oxidizes fat and builds lean muscle tissue but HGH was 56% greater after the resistance workout compared to steady state cycling.

“That increased boost of Human Growth Hormone (HGH) caused by the resistance workout makes a big difference in ongoing calorie expenditure because HGH oxidises fat and builds lean muscle tissue, which in turn burns more calories,” says Hastings. â€œThe more muscle you can build, the more calories your body will burn long-term. Combine that with increased fat loss and the result leads to rapid changes in body composition.”

Additionally, blood lactate was also measured. The accumulation of lactate from exercise sparks the hormone growth response described above. In fact, it is widely accepted that exercising at an intensity above the lactate threshold, for a minimum of 10 minutes within a workout, is the greatest stimulus there is to the secretion of HGH.  Lactate was a staggering 81% greater after the resistance training workout as compared to the cycling workout.

In this era of activity tracking when we have instant workout data at our fingertips, it’s tempting to measure all exercise by the number of calories burned, this study clearly demonstrates that it’s not just about the number of calories burned but the variety of ways in which you burn them. 

A workout regime that combines the right balance of resistance and cardio training helps ensure all the positive long-term benefits are maximized, making calorie counting just one consideration when judging your workout.

About Les Mills
Les Mills International is the creator of 21 global group fitness and team training programs, including BODYPUMP® (weights), BODYCOMBAT® (martial arts), RPM® (indoor cycling), LES MILLS GRIT® (30-minute high intensity interval training) and LES MILLS SPRINTâ„¢ (high-intensity cycling). Every week, millions of people get fit in 19,500 clubs across 100 countries with the help of 130,000 Les Mills instructors. In the U.S. alone, Les Mills has 33,000 highly-trained instructors teaching at 3,800 gyms and clubs.

Significant investment in ongoing research is an important part of Les Mills’ business, and enables its club partners and their members to know that Les Mills group fitness programs are effective and safe.  Les Mills partners with universities around the world to conduct research to investigate areas of exercise science it wants to find out more about and test the effects of its programs on key community health factors such as obesity and heart disease.  Its research is independent, peer-reviewed and industry-recognized. 

For more information, visit lesmills.com/research

 

SEE ORIGINAL STUDY

 

 

COMMENTS | COMMENTING POLICY

We recommend

Experts Available at ACSM Summit; Metabolic Training – The Ultimate Cardio+Resistance Training Fusion!

Newswise

Resistance Training Complements Aerobic Exercise for Women

Newswise

Tips on Choosing the Right Trainer from Cedars-Sinai Weight Loss Center Physician with Unique Expertise

Newswise

Minutes of Hard Exercise Can Lead to All-Day Calorie Burn

Newswise

M. D. Anderson’s Seven-Day Exercise Plan

Newswise

Effect of tai chi versus aerobic exercise for fibromyalgia: comparative effectiveness randomized controlled trial

Chenchen Wang et al., The BMJ

Moving beyond cardio: the value of resistance training, balance training, and other forms of exercise in the management of diabetes.

Marni J Armstrong et al., Diabetes Spectr

Effect of regular exercise training on changes in HbA1c, BMI and VO2max among patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus: an 8-year trial

Farzad Najafipour et al., BMJ Open Diab Res Care

Stair ascending–descending exercise accelerates the decrease in postprandial hyperglycemia more efficiently than bicycle exercise

Tetsuo Takaishi et al., BMJ Open Diab Res Care

Share your Insights and Learn How Readers Discover Content

TrendMD, Renew Publishing Consultants