Contact Us

Use the form on the right to contact us.

You can edit the text in this area, and change where the contact form on the right submits to, by entering edit mode using the modes on the bottom right. 

14893 Northwest Purvis Drive
Portland, OR, 97229
United States

971-208-5909

Reliable source for medical, health and beauty products, medical review articles and business medicine services.

HEALTH CARE NEWS

US Congress extends CHIP, funds opioid crisis response following temporary shutdown

Publish date: February 9, 2018

By 

Gregory Twachtman 

Oncology Practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congress, despite a second shutdown in less than a month, was able to pass a number of financial extenders to fund key health care programs.

The bipartisan spending bill (H.R. 1892), passed in the early morning hours on Feb. 9 by a 71-28 vote in the Senate (16 Republicans and 12 Democrats voted against it, and Sen. John McCain [R-Ariz.] was not present) and a 240-186 vote in the House (67 Republicans and 119 Democrats voted against and 5 representatives did not vote). President Trump signed the bill later that morning.

 

The spending bill and continuing resolution to fund the government through March 23 includes $6 billion to fund treatment for opioid addiction and other mental health issues, $2 billion in additional funding for the National Institutes of Health, and 4 additional years of funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program. The additional CHIP funding extends the program for a total of 10 years.

The funding bill also made a technical correction to the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) track of the Medicare Quality Payment Program. It removes Part B drug reimbursement from the MIPS payment adjustment, so any positive or negative change to physician payments based on the MIPS score will only be applied to physician fee schedule payments.

The bill also repeals the Independent Payment Advisory Board, a panel created by the Affordable Care Act that would have the power to slash Medicare spending under certain budget circumstances. That board was never convened.

The funding legislation also accelerates closure of the Medicare Part D “donut hole,” the coverage gap in which beneficiaries must pay 100% of medication costs prior to entering catastrophic coverage.

Just over $7 billion was provided for community health centers and Medicare’s therapy caps were repealed.

While the funding bill was written in the Senate with bipartisan input and received bipartisan support, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) held up votes over objections to the more than $1 trillion it will add to the nation’s debt, as well as for the fact that there was no opportunity to introduce and vote on amendments, leading to an hours-long government shutdown.

There also were concerns about two issues that could have derailed the vote in the House. Democrats wanted to add language to address immigrants brought to this nation illegally as children, while some Republicans did not want to increase the federal debt. However, there were enough votes to pass the funding legislation.

gtwachtman@frontlinemedcom.com

Study Addresses Barriers to Kidney Disease Screening Among Black Americans

Drotumdi O

 Study Addresses Barriers to Kidney Disease Screening Among Black Americans  Article ID: 690790  Released: 9-Mar-2018 2:00 PM EST  Source Newsroom:  American Society of Nephrology (ASN)    Add to Favorites    more news from this source   Share     MEDIA CONTACT   Available for logged-in reporters only   CITATIONS   Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology   CHANNELS   All Journal News ,  Kidney Disease ,  Local - DC ,  Local - DC Metro   KEYWORDS   kidney disease screening ,  Black Americans       Highlight   In a study of Black Americans who participated in focus group sessions, certain participant factors—such as knowledge of kidney disease and spiritual and cultural influences—and logistical factors—such as convenience and awareness of scheduling—were identified as barriers that may prevent Black Americans from being screened for kidney disease.   Black Americans are at increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease and kidney failure.    Newswise — Washington, DC (March 15, 2018) —  The incidence of kidney failure is 3 times higher in Black Americans than in whites, and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) continues to rise among Black Americans while it has stabilized in other racial groups. New research points to potential barriers that may prevent Black Americans from being screened for kidney disease. The findings, which are published in an upcoming issue of the  Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology  (CJASN), may help guide efforts to address important kidney-related disparities in the United States.  A common strategy to promote awareness of a health condition and to id entify individuals at risk is community-based health programs. To identify Black Americans’ perspectives of barriers and facilitators of community-based screening for CKD, a team led by Kerri Cavanaugh, MD, MHS and Ebele Umeukeje, MD, MPH (Vanderbilt University Medical Center) performed 3 focus groups of adults in Black American churches in Nashville, Tennessee. Questions examined views on CKD information, access to care, and priorities of kidney disease health.  In the study of 32 Black Americans who participated in focus group sessions, 2 major categories of barriers to kidney disease screening were apparent: participant factors including limited kidney disease knowledge, spiritual/religious beliefs, and culture of the individual; and logistical factors including lack of convenience and incentives, and poor advertisement.  “In particular, trust and effective communication appear to be novel influential themes for achieving optimal participation of Black Americans in kidney disease screening events,” said Dr. Umeukeje. “Therefore, culturally sensitive education and stakeholder engagement are likely effective strategies to improve communication, build trust, minimize fear, maximize participation in kidney disease screening events, and ultimately improve outcomes in Black Americans at risk of kidney disease.”  Dr. Umeukeje noted that the low trust among Black Americans extended beyond the well-known mistrust of research and healthcare practices to include mistrust of certain aspects of community-based screening practices. “For instance, there was mistrust of urine collection because of a concern that it may be used for drug screening instead of detection of protein in urine, which is a marker of kidney disease,” she said. “Additionally, spirituality among Black Americans and the notion that self-care is really God’s responsibility was also found to discourage some people from embracing kidney disease screening practices.”  Stigma associated with a kidney disease diagnosis and the explicit fear of being diagnosed with a condition that could lead to dialysis was a significant concern. Interestingly, there was concern from men about being labeled with a diagnosis that would force them to assume a ‘sick role’, which they felt would challenge their manhood, or the need to take medications that might decrease their libido. Many people admitted that incentives such as gift items, free food, and entertainment would encourage participation in kidney disease screening programs.  In an accompanying editorial, Keith Norris, MD, PhD and Susanne Nicholas, MD, MPH, PhD (David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA) noted that the study provides a timely and well-balanced set of recommendations capturing key barriers and facilitators to consider in advancing CKD screening. “Ongoing authentic engagement with respect and partnership can help to attenuate the mistrust and activate African American communities to take a more proactive stand on their health,” they wrote.  Study co-authors include Marcus Wild, BA, Saugar Maripuri, MD, MPH, Teresa Davidson BS, Margaret Rutherford, BA, Khaled Abdel-Kader, MD, MS, Julia Lewis MD, and Consuelo Wilkins MD, MSCI.  Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.  The article, entitled “Black Americans’ Perspectives of Barriers and Facilitators of Community Screening for Kidney Disease,” will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on March 15, 2018. doi: 10.2215/CJN.0750717.  The editorial, entitled Community-Based CKD Screening in African Americans,” will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on March 15, 2018.   The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.    Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has nearly 18,000 members representing 112 countries. For more information, please visit  www.asn-online.org  or contact the society at 202-640-4660.   # # #       SEE ORIGINAL STUDY           COMMENTS  |  COMMENTING POLICY   We recommend   Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Rates Are Low in Women with Advanced Kidney Disease   Newswise   Certain Vulnerable Groups Are Less Likely to Use E-Health Resources   Newswise   Kidney Disease Hides in People with Undiagnosed Diabetes   Newswise   Kidney Disease a Big Risk for Younger, Low-Income Minorities   Newswise   Study Compares Different Measures of Body Fat for Predicting Kidney Function Decline   Newswise   Findings identify barriers to kidney disease screening among black Americans   Healio   Findings identify barriers to kidney disease screening among black Americans   Healio   Understanding CKD among patients with T2DM: prevalence, temporal trends, and treatment patterns—NHANES 2007–2012   Bingcao Wu et al., BMJ Open Diab Res Care   Register now for MedCity INVEST - Premier healthcare investing event in the Midwest   MedCity - INVEST Conference   Can Social Media Improve Medical Care?   Amy Coelho, Weatherby Healthcare   Powered by  TrendMD      View All Latest News

Study Addresses Barriers to Kidney Disease Screening Among Black Americans

Article ID: 690790

Released: 9-Mar-2018 2:00 PM EST

Source Newsroom: American Society of Nephrology (ASN)

Add to Favorites

more news from this source

Share

 

MEDIA CONTACT

Available for logged-in reporters only

CITATIONS

Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology

CHANNELS

All Journal News, Kidney Disease, Local - DC, Local - DC Metro

KEYWORDS

kidney disease screening, Black Americans

 

Highlight

In a study of Black Americans who participated in focus group sessions, certain participant factors—such as knowledge of kidney disease and spiritual and cultural influences—and logistical factors—such as convenience and awareness of scheduling—were identified as barriers that may prevent Black Americans from being screened for kidney disease.

Black Americans are at increased risk of developing chronic kidney disease and kidney failure.

Newswise — Washington, DC (March 15, 2018) — The incidence of kidney failure is 3 times higher in Black Americans than in whites, and the prevalence of chronic kidney disease (CKD) continues to rise among Black Americans while it has stabilized in other racial groups. New research points to potential barriers that may prevent Black Americans from being screened for kidney disease. The findings, which are published in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (CJASN), may help guide efforts to address important kidney-related disparities in the United States.

A common strategy to promote awareness of a health condition and to id entify individuals at risk is community-based health programs. To identify Black Americans’ perspectives of barriers and facilitators of community-based screening for CKD, a team led by Kerri Cavanaugh, MD, MHS and Ebele Umeukeje, MD, MPH (Vanderbilt University Medical Center) performed 3 focus groups of adults in Black American churches in Nashville, Tennessee. Questions examined views on CKD information, access to care, and priorities of kidney disease health.

In the study of 32 Black Americans who participated in focus group sessions, 2 major categories of barriers to kidney disease screening were apparent: participant factors including limited kidney disease knowledge, spiritual/religious beliefs, and culture of the individual; and logistical factors including lack of convenience and incentives, and poor advertisement.

“In particular, trust and effective communication appear to be novel influential themes for achieving optimal participation of Black Americans in kidney disease screening events,” said Dr. Umeukeje. “Therefore, culturally sensitive education and stakeholder engagement are likely effective strategies to improve communication, build trust, minimize fear, maximize participation in kidney disease screening events, and ultimately improve outcomes in Black Americans at risk of kidney disease.”

Dr. Umeukeje noted that the low trust among Black Americans extended beyond the well-known mistrust of research and healthcare practices to include mistrust of certain aspects of community-based screening practices. “For instance, there was mistrust of urine collection because of a concern that it may be used for drug screening instead of detection of protein in urine, which is a marker of kidney disease,” she said. “Additionally, spirituality among Black Americans and the notion that self-care is really God’s responsibility was also found to discourage some people from embracing kidney disease screening practices.”

Stigma associated with a kidney disease diagnosis and the explicit fear of being diagnosed with a condition that could lead to dialysis was a significant concern. Interestingly, there was concern from men about being labeled with a diagnosis that would force them to assume a ‘sick role’, which they felt would challenge their manhood, or the need to take medications that might decrease their libido. Many people admitted that incentives such as gift items, free food, and entertainment would encourage participation in kidney disease screening programs.

In an accompanying editorial, Keith Norris, MD, PhD and Susanne Nicholas, MD, MPH, PhD (David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA) noted that the study provides a timely and well-balanced set of recommendations capturing key barriers and facilitators to consider in advancing CKD screening. “Ongoing authentic engagement with respect and partnership can help to attenuate the mistrust and activate African American communities to take a more proactive stand on their health,” they wrote.

Study co-authors include Marcus Wild, BA, Saugar Maripuri, MD, MPH, Teresa Davidson BS, Margaret Rutherford, BA, Khaled Abdel-Kader, MD, MS, Julia Lewis MD, and Consuelo Wilkins MD, MSCI.

Disclosures: The authors reported no financial disclosures.

The article, entitled “Black Americans’ Perspectives of Barriers and Facilitators of Community Screening for Kidney Disease,” will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on March 15, 2018. doi: 10.2215/CJN.0750717.

The editorial, entitled Community-Based CKD Screening in African Americans,” will appear online at http://cjasn.asnjournals.org/ on March 15, 2018.

The content of this article does not reflect the views or opinions of The American Society of Nephrology (ASN). Responsibility for the information and views expressed therein lies entirely with the author(s). ASN does not offer medical advice. All content in ASN publications is for informational purposes only, and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects. This content should not be used during a medical emergency or for the diagnosis or treatment of any medical condition. Please consult your doctor or other qualified health care provider if you have any questions about a medical condition, or before taking any drug, changing your diet or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. Do not ignore or delay obtaining professional medical advice because of information accessed through ASN. Call 911 or your doctor for all medical emergencies.

Since 1966, ASN has been leading the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients. ASN has nearly 18,000 members representing 112 countries. For more information, please visit www.asn-online.org or contact the society at 202-640-4660.

# # #

 

SEE ORIGINAL STUDY

 

 

COMMENTS | COMMENTING POLICY

We recommend

Breast and Cervical Cancer Screening Rates Are Low in Women with Advanced Kidney Disease

Newswise

Certain Vulnerable Groups Are Less Likely to Use E-Health Resources

Newswise

Kidney Disease Hides in People with Undiagnosed Diabetes

Newswise

Kidney Disease a Big Risk for Younger, Low-Income Minorities

Newswise

Study Compares Different Measures of Body Fat for Predicting Kidney Function Decline

Newswise

Findings identify barriers to kidney disease screening among black Americans

Healio

Findings identify barriers to kidney disease screening among black Americans

Healio

Understanding CKD among patients with T2DM: prevalence, temporal trends, and treatment patterns—NHANES 2007–2012

Bingcao Wu et al., BMJ Open Diab Res Care

Register now for MedCity INVEST - Premier healthcare investing event in the Midwest

MedCity - INVEST Conference

Can Social Media Improve Medical Care?

Amy Coelho, Weatherby Healthcare

Powered by TrendMD

View All Latest News