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HEALTH CARE NEWS

US Congress extends CHIP, funds opioid crisis response following temporary shutdown

Publish date: February 9, 2018

By 

Gregory Twachtman 

Oncology Practice

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Congress, despite a second shutdown in less than a month, was able to pass a number of financial extenders to fund key health care programs.

The bipartisan spending bill (H.R. 1892), passed in the early morning hours on Feb. 9 by a 71-28 vote in the Senate (16 Republicans and 12 Democrats voted against it, and Sen. John McCain [R-Ariz.] was not present) and a 240-186 vote in the House (67 Republicans and 119 Democrats voted against and 5 representatives did not vote). President Trump signed the bill later that morning.

 

The spending bill and continuing resolution to fund the government through March 23 includes $6 billion to fund treatment for opioid addiction and other mental health issues, $2 billion in additional funding for the National Institutes of Health, and 4 additional years of funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program. The additional CHIP funding extends the program for a total of 10 years.

The funding bill also made a technical correction to the Merit-based Incentive Payment System (MIPS) track of the Medicare Quality Payment Program. It removes Part B drug reimbursement from the MIPS payment adjustment, so any positive or negative change to physician payments based on the MIPS score will only be applied to physician fee schedule payments.

The bill also repeals the Independent Payment Advisory Board, a panel created by the Affordable Care Act that would have the power to slash Medicare spending under certain budget circumstances. That board was never convened.

The funding legislation also accelerates closure of the Medicare Part D “donut hole,” the coverage gap in which beneficiaries must pay 100% of medication costs prior to entering catastrophic coverage.

Just over $7 billion was provided for community health centers and Medicare’s therapy caps were repealed.

While the funding bill was written in the Senate with bipartisan input and received bipartisan support, Sen. Rand Paul (R-Ky.) held up votes over objections to the more than $1 trillion it will add to the nation’s debt, as well as for the fact that there was no opportunity to introduce and vote on amendments, leading to an hours-long government shutdown.

There also were concerns about two issues that could have derailed the vote in the House. Democrats wanted to add language to address immigrants brought to this nation illegally as children, while some Republicans did not want to increase the federal debt. However, there were enough votes to pass the funding legislation.

gtwachtman@frontlinemedcom.com

CDC: Beware Brazil yellow fever outbreak

Drotumdi O

 FDA/CDC  CDC: Beware Brazil yellow fever outbreak   Publish date:  March 16, 2018   By     Ian Lacy   Internal Medicine News                       The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that travelers who haven’t been vaccinated against yellow fever should avoid travel to Brazil, according to a media teleconference by CDC officials.  “The most important new recommendation ... is that travelers should not go to these yellow fever hot spots in Brazil, unless they are vaccinated,” stated  Martin Cetron, MD , director of the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine at the CDC. “Health officials in Brazil recently confirmed more than 920 cases of yellow fever, including more than 300 deaths, during this outbreak” he added.  ©DamrongpanThongwat/thinkstock  Yellow fever is a fairly common infection in locations such as South America, and is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito, according to Dr. Cetron. He pointed out that Brazil’s yellow fever outbreak has been spreading into areas popular with tourists, including urban centers such as Rio De Janeiro.  Since the beginning of 2018, 10 travel-related cases of yellow fever have been reported among international travelers returning from Brazil. Four of these travelers died. All 10 travelers had not received the yellow fever vaccine. Of these 10 travelers, 8 acquired the disease on Ilha Grande, an island off the coast of Rio De Janeiro that is popular among tourists.  Pages  1   2    3    next ›    last »   Next Article:   Increasing sepsis survivorship creates new challenges      Comments (0)  Recommended for You  News & Commentary   Some non-AIDS conditions hint at HIV infection in adults    Many drugs in the pipeline for IBD treatment    Putting IBD medication risks into perspective    MDedge Daily News: How facts help fight statin phobia    NASH rapidly overtaking hepatitis C as cause of liver cancer   Quizzes from MD-IQ   AGA best practices: Fecal incontinence & defecatory disorder management    Carcinoid syndrome & carcinoid crisis   Research Summaries from ClinicalEdge   Cocaine & Marijuana Use in Young Adults with MI    Device Closure in Patients with PFO & Cryptogenic Stroke    Infectious Diseases    Vaccines   Close

FDA/CDC

CDC: Beware Brazil yellow fever outbreak

Publish date: March 16, 2018

By

Ian Lacy

Internal Medicine News

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommends that travelers who haven’t been vaccinated against yellow fever should avoid travel to Brazil, according to a media teleconference by CDC officials.

“The most important new recommendation ... is that travelers should not go to these yellow fever hot spots in Brazil, unless they are vaccinated,” stated Martin Cetron, MD, director of the Division of Global Migration and Quarantine at the CDC. “Health officials in Brazil recently confirmed more than 920 cases of yellow fever, including more than 300 deaths, during this outbreak” he added.

©DamrongpanThongwat/thinkstock

Yellow fever is a fairly common infection in locations such as South America, and is spread by the bite of an infected mosquito, according to Dr. Cetron. He pointed out that Brazil’s yellow fever outbreak has been spreading into areas popular with tourists, including urban centers such as Rio De Janeiro.

Since the beginning of 2018, 10 travel-related cases of yellow fever have been reported among international travelers returning from Brazil. Four of these travelers died. All 10 travelers had not received the yellow fever vaccine. Of these 10 travelers, 8 acquired the disease on Ilha Grande, an island off the coast of Rio De Janeiro that is popular among tourists.

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Increasing sepsis survivorship creates new challenges

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News & Commentary

Some non-AIDS conditions hint at HIV infection in adults

Many drugs in the pipeline for IBD treatment

Putting IBD medication risks into perspective

MDedge Daily News: How facts help fight statin phobia

NASH rapidly overtaking hepatitis C as cause of liver cancer

Quizzes from MD-IQ

AGA best practices: Fecal incontinence & defecatory disorder management

Carcinoid syndrome & carcinoid crisis

Research Summaries from ClinicalEdge

Cocaine & Marijuana Use in Young Adults with MI

Device Closure in Patients with PFO & Cryptogenic Stroke

Infectious Diseases

Vaccines

Close